New bicycle!

October 12, 2019 at 20:13 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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A momentous day! A new bicycle has appeared in the Chillikebab household. Sadly, not for me. But for Chillikebab Jnr 2. It seems only a few months ago I was putting her into a tiny seat, but now she has graduated to hew first real ‘proper’ bike – a 24 inch wheeled beauty with hub gears.

I remember by first 24 inch wheel bike. It was an Enfield racer, bright yellow. And it was freedom. It was the first bike that I could really go places on. The combination of being older and having a bike that could cover distances meant I could really go exploring. It was independence, fun and adventure.

I see some of the same things with Chillikebab Jnr 2. With this bike, she can bowl along. She now leaves her sister behind (who refuses to ride a bike, and sticks to her scooter) on the way to school. She can cover distances. She feels grown up.

But what she doesn’t have is the freedom. She can’t go off and explore the neighbourhood by herself on that bike. Why? Because selfish car drivers don’t want her too. They are too concerned with their own convenience to consider the way they restrict the freedoms of others. They swing around corners, ignore red lights, don’t look where they are going, park on footpaths, intimidate vulnerable road users, and generally make the environment so intimidating and dangerous that an eight year old cannot navigate it alone. This makes me cross.

Still, on a happier note we went for a much longer ride today – all the way around the Bay Run. Chillikebab Jnr 2 did fine – hardly even broke a sweat. And she (and I) both had a ball. So here’s to the joy of riding a bike.

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Puncture

September 1, 2019 at 13:27 | Posted in bicycles | 1 Comment
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I don’t get punctures any more. Truly. Punctures are a thing other people get – mostly people running silly narrow lightweight tyres at high pressures. Run 32mm, heavy-duty tyres at 85psi, and you will not get punctures.

Well, actually that’s not quite true. You might get one if you don’t replace the tyre when it is worn out. As the tyre gets very thin, you risk of punctures goes up. And as I tend to run my tyres until they are pretty much disintegrating, this does sometimes happen to me.

And so it did, and I got a puncture. So I bought the necessary ingredients, and fixed it all up. Hurrah.

 

 

New pedals

August 24, 2019 at 13:25 | Posted in bicycles | 2 Comments
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So I needed new pedals again. Pesky things keep wearing out.  The first lot I had lasted ten years, according to this, but these one only lasted five. Perhaps I’m doing more kilometers on this bike than I was. Anyway, I bought some more, and got out my pedal wrench to fit them.

However, I hit a snag. I couldn’t get them off. They were stuck tight. I tried all sorts of things, different spanners, cheater bars, blocks of wood – but they would not budge. I even managed to break a fancy chrome-vanadium spanner in the attempt. I took the cranks off, and got the guys in the machine shop at work to have a crack at it with their array of professional vices, jigs and tools, but to no avail.

Oh dear. It seemed like I was going to have to replace the cranks as well. I looked at various options for crank replacements, but nothing seemed very easy. In the meantime, my feet were slopping around in the pedals like sloppy things.

Then, on they way to work, I popped into the bike shop. You might be thinking that I should probably have done this in the beginning. And you would be right. Using whatever secret bicycle shop techniques they have they managed to get the old pedals off, and put new ones on. Slightly fancier ones, to boot. They did wryly say ‘it was a bit tricky’. Anyway, kudos to the guys at Park Bikes. I am now set for another five or ten years…

The long long bicycle

August 18, 2019 at 20:58 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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I finally got around to doing something I’d been idly wondering about for years. As regular readers will know, I have a Burley trailer which I hitch to my cargo bike using a modified rack. And I also have a luggage trailer that I sometimes use to go to the airport (although since I have a new job I don’t have to travel any more, thankfully, so the trailer rarely gets used).

But here’s the question – could I hitch the luggage trailer to the back of the Burley? Of course I could! And yesterday I finally had reason to do it – I wanted to take to kids to the nearby Ferragosto street fair, and also drop off a load of obsolete clothes to the charity clothing bin thingy (yes, I also finally got around to culling some of my old clothes).

So I hitched it all up, and off we went. The only snag I could foresee was that because of the short chainstays on the Burley, there was a risk the arm of the trailer would touch the back of the left foot of the child pedalling if I went round a sharp bend. So I instructed the kids to watch out for this on the corners, and off we went.

In practice, this was not an issue at all. We couldn’t really go around sharp corners, and in any case the dual articulation meant that the angle of the trailer never got acute. The kids thought it was all terrific fun, and to be honest so did I. We got heaps of comments and admiring looks, and safely made the trip there and back without incident.

One thing that was basically impossible though was wheeling the thing backwards to park. I now have a new respect for truck drivers who reverse those dual-trailer B-doubles…

Aldi bike cam light

August 14, 2019 at 21:52 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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As you may remember, a while ago my Cycliq rear camera light died on the operating table. Cycliq offered me a 15% discount on a new one, which was sort of nice and sort of not very generous too. Anyway, serendipitously, the very next week Aldi were offering integrated rear light bike cameras for just $69. So I bought one.

It’s clear that someone took a Fly6 to China, and asked a factory there to make something similar but at a very low price. It takes a lot of its design cues from the Fly6, although it’s a lot bigger overall. It has IPX4 waterproofing (which is less than the Fly6, but adequate for most purposes), similar arrangements of buttons and slot covers, and some similar features.

First up, it’s somewhat bulky and heavy. I don’t really care, but if you like your bike to look sleek and / or worry about weight, this is not for you. It uses a rubber bungee things to attach to the bike, and this is actually pretty good – one of the better designs of such things. Better, in fact, than the original Fly6 clip.

It can take a maximum 32GB microSD card, and records in 1080p, 30fps. The video files are broken up into 10 minute pieces, and you can fit about seven hours of footage on a 32GB card.

The light is quite bright, and has steady and two flashing modes, but it’s not spectacular. You can turn the light on and off independently of the camera; there are separate switches for the two functions. A dim green LED lights up to show the camera is operating. The camera automatically overwrites the oldest footage on the card as it goes, so there’s no need to manually delete files on the card.

The battery lasts for about 3 hours, some way short of the claimed 5-6 hours. When the battery gets low, the camera turns off and it bleeps, but the light stays on for a while longer. The manual claims it stays on for 1-2 hours, but it doesn’t; you get about 30 minutes of light before the battery goes completely dead.

There is no function that turns off the camera if you are in a crash, but the recommendation is to put a big SD card in so the battery runs out before your crash footage is overwritten. With the supplied 8GB card, this could happen, but with a 32GB card you are safe – the card will not fill up on a single battery charge.

The quality of the video is just OK. Less good than my 2nd gen Fly6 (which was only 720p), and I’m sure nowhere near the latest Cycliq cameras. There is no stabilisation or other tricks. As is often the case with these cams, the audio is as good as useless. Night time performance is pretty terrible; there’s note much chance you will be able to make out a number plate on footage taken when it’s not daytime. Also the lens seemed to get scratched very easily; it obviously gets dirt on it from it’s position above the wheel, and wiping it away has scratched the lens a lot in a short amount of time.

Here’s some samples of video:

Daytime – road

Dusk – off-road

Dark – Road

One thing you will notice is that the red flashing light leaks into the video, especially at night. That doesn’t bother me, but if you are hoping to capture epic footage for your cycling film, it’s probably not for you. Actually, if you want good video quality, it’s probably not for you. But if you just want a basic cam to record the daily goings on on your ride, it works quite adequately. My Fly6 lasted four years, so at a quarter the cost I will be quids in if it lasts more than twelve months.

New route to work

May 7, 2019 at 15:27 | Posted in bicycles | 1 Comment
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I have found a new route to work. After nearly being crushed, and then running the gamut of dangerous drivers, I realised that a new parallel route had opened up which means I can completely skip that horrible DFO roundabout, and have a lovely off-road cruise.

It’s because of the Opal tower – yes, that one, the one that is falling down (but which has a bike shop at the bottom, so can’t be all bad). Well, when they built that, they also built a new pedestrian bridge over the road, which now means the path along the canal from Strathfield links up properly with Olympic Park. Previously you got close to where you wanted to go, and then the path sort of veered madly to the left and went off into the wilderness.

This means that a bit more than half of my ride to work is now on lovely off-road paths, through the trees and along the canal. I can hear the birds tweeting, enjoy the swish of my tyres on the path and generally enjoy a stress-free ride.

If all riding was like this, just think how any people would do it!

Red lights

May 1, 2019 at 09:50 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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You may remember this incident, when my bicycle was eaten by an SUV on my way home. Well, since that happened I’ve been avoiding that roundabout by using the footpath, which is designated as a shared path. It’s not ideal, as it’s a bit narrow and bumpy in places, but it’s better than getting squashed.

Or is it? To go around it you have to navigate two pedestrian crossings at the entrance and exit to the roundabout. They are a bit strange, as they do not have a green light – just the amber and red ones. I presume this is in case dumb motorists think the green light is for them to barrel on to the roundabout, not just for the crossing set back ten metres or so from the roundabout.

That said, there are very large signs telling motorists they are approaching pedestrian actuated signals, and even a flashing orange beacon to alert them on approach if they are about to turn red – the flashing lights remain in place until they go off (as there is no green, they just go blank when the crossing phase is finished).

Whether due to this unconventional arrangement or just because drivers are dumb, clueless and absolutely appalling at actually looking where they are going, no-one stops for these red lights.

That probably sounds like an exaggeration, but it’s true. Most days, several cars just drive straight over them, right in the middle of the red phase when the green man is showing. It is both startling and alarming.

I’ve been recording some of this on Twitter for a while:

You get the idea. And just in case you thought my ‘most days’ was exaggerating, check the dates on those tweets. There is heaps more on my Twitter feed too.

So what do the local police do?

Pull me over to talk about helmets. Thanks for keeping us safe, @NSWPolice.

Lime e-bike share

April 8, 2019 at 18:28 | Posted in bicycles | 2 Comments
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Dockless bike share it seemed was dead in Sydney. Whilst several systems launched with some fanfare, they ultimately all failed; as I wrote back in late 2017 when they launched:

To my mind the environment is against them – a government generally hostile to cycling, apathy on the part of the public and helmet laws could well end up making them nonviable.

lime bike

Pretty much every part of that prediction came to pass. Bikes were vandalised, had the helmets stolen and were dumped, local councils passed regulations that imposed massive fines on the operators and the police kept us all safe with endless helmet crackdowns. I could feel smug about the accuracy of this prediction, but to be honest to bet against any kind of bicycle advancement in Sydney is a very very safe bet.

Notwithstanding all these failures (four systems have completely gone; one limps on with a smattering of bikes and almost no investment or support), another system has sprung up – this time not with low-cost utility bikes, but with more sophisticated e-bikes.

And so, I took one for a ride to test it out.

The first impression were very favourable. These bikes are very comfortable. They are actually large enough to ride properly – the other systems, even the better ones, always felt a bit small for me (and I’m not especially tall). I could get the seat right where I wanted it, and sit very comfortably.

The electric assist is not as refined as on Mrs Chillikebab’s e-bike, but certainly has some grunt. It tends to pull a bit too hard when you start pedaling, and the power seems to fade as you get up even a small amount of speed (but still below the 25kph limit for e-bike assist), but at low speeds it can really haul you up a hill with ease.

motoeThere are no gears, but with the motor this is less of an issue. The app is easy to use, although there is no trial period (perhaps not surprising, given the expense of the bikes). There is a geo-fence, which once again is not well signaled in the app. I have seen quite a few Lime bikes outside of this area, so I’m not quite sure what happens if you go outside. But inside the area there is, for now at least, plenty of them around.

How they keep them charged I don’t know; there must be quite a support system behind them. They are a bit more pricey than the other systems (a short ride will cost $3-5, vs the $1-2 for the non electric systems), but to my mind it is worth it – cheaper than the bus, comfortable and you don’t even work up a sweat.

I’ll ride them some more and give some more impressions in due course, but for now I am a fan. It is the best bike share to have come to Sydney. I just hope it can survive the hostile environment…

 

And again….

July 23, 2018 at 21:57 | Posted in bicycles | 10 Comments
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Yes, it happened again. Again, when I was stationary. Festooned in hi-viz and flashing lights. A car drove into me – a sort of low-speed crunching as my bicycle was devoured by the front of his gas-guzzling SUV. Thankfully the driver stopped before he got to me, leaving my bike jammed under his car, my saddle (where I was sitting) hard up against his bonnet. (video here)

It is getting worse out there. Drivers are increasingly distracted. Mobile phone use is endemic, and rarely properly policed. Most modern cars now feature touch-screens that take drivers attention away from the road for ten or twenty seconds at a time as they prod at it to change the radio or operate the sat nav.

Against this near-universal back drop, in Sydney it is further stoked by the increasing aggression shown by drivers towards cyclists. This is rooted in the aggressively anti-cycling stance of the state government, coupled with heavy handed anti-cycling policing, all capped with a broadly anti-cycling safety ‘industry’ that seeks to blame cyclists for the increasing road toll and a populist media near universally playing the ‘law-breaking cyclist’ and ‘war on the roads’ angles constantly.

I am now at a point, sad to say, where I would not recommend to anyone they cycle in Sydney. I used to encourage my colleagues to cycle to work. I no longer do that. The environment is so hostile that I can’t recommend it. This, of course, makes me very sad, and also very angry. The sheer stupidity and short-sightedness of our policy makers and media is breathtaking. In the latest NSW budget, there are zero dollars for cycling, and all mentions of cycling targets or programs have been expunged from the Transport for NSW website. Pretty much all that remains are pages telling cyclists to wear helmets and ‘share the road’.

Well, I was sharing the road the other day. It just seems others don’t want to share it with me.

 

PS The police, predictably, refused to take a statement or follow up the incident, even when given the video footage. Too busy policing deserted stop signs, perhaps.

New Camera – Shimano CM-2000

June 27, 2018 at 21:40 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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A few months ago, the Shimano camera I have facing forward on my bike fell off. The clip isn’t all that great, and I apparently hadn’t secured it properly. After pinging across the road, it still worked – but the lens was cracked. A new lens cost $40, so I didn’t buy one; after all the camera came with a spare one (of a different shape for using under water) which I thought would be fine. Except that I couldn’t find it anywhere. And then it seems what remaining stocks of spare lenses that might have been around evaporated, and were no longer available anywhere.

The great thing about Shimano bike cameras though is that they are absolutely awful. Not the actual camera bit;  the physical design (apart perhaps for the clip) and the video quality is fine. No, rather all the other bits are awful. They WiFi connection is flaky as. The battery life is ordinary. The app is a disaster. The promised video editing software to overlay your data has never made an appearance. This means that, when launched, they retail at $500 but after a while are available for a song as no-one wants to buy them.

And it seems Shimano made a version 2 bike cam, and this too is awful, and is now also available for a song. A $149 song, in fact – which is not a bad price for a high-quality HD waterproof camera, even if none of the other features work. So I bought one. Although they still don’t include a handlebar mount, I was able it improvise a stem mount from the helmet mount and some cable ties.

It’s definitely better than version 1 – especially in low light. But the clip is exactly the same. And on the third outing with the new camera, it too pinged across the road after going over a bump. Luckily, the lens was not broken (the design means it’s a bit less vulnerable than version 1), and it still works…

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