Arnott’s Cheeseboard cracker assortment

December 29, 2017 at 17:08 | Posted in biscuits | Leave a comment
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Christmas. Cheese. Those two words are intimately associated in my mind. When I was growing up, Christmas was that time of year when the fridge was piled high with more then just the usual economy Cheddar or Cheshire – delights such as mellow Stilton, rich Camembert, tangy Danish Blue. Later other more exotic offerings were also included – Shropshire Blue, Stinking Bishop, soft goats cheese. Mmmmmm. And, being Christmas, you were allowed to eat it – normal rationing was suspended for the festive period.

This is a tradition that Mrs Chillikebab happily has adopted, so as I speak the fridge is groaning with a cornucopia of cheesy delights. And to go with such a feast, you need crackers.

Arnott’s to the rescue – or more specifically, the Arnott’s Cheeseboard Assortment to the rescue. So how does this selection work out? Is it a worthy partner to my festive cheeseboard?

The selection features six different crackers – Sesame Wheat Cracker, Water Cracker, Harvest Wheat Cracker, Sesame Water Cracker, Stoneground Cracker and Entertaining Cracker.

Keen followers of either this blog, or Arnott’s biscuits (or perhaps both) will immediately realise that most of these crackers are not ones you can actually buy on their own. It’s a bit odd. ‘Entertaining Cracker’, but not Savoy or Jatz? ‘Harvest Wheat’, but not ‘Country Cheese‘? ‘Stoneground’, but not ‘Multigrain‘? Indeed, the only bone fide variety from the main range is the water cracker – probably the most boring one of the lot.

When Arnott’s make sweet biscuit selections, they include ‘all your favourites‘. But here, it seems they have taken a different approach. Rather  that giving a selection from their rather wonderful range of crackers and savoury biscuits, they seem to have baked some lower-quality alternatives and served them up all together the hope we won’t notice.

Boo, hiss, Arnott’s. These are not up to your normal standards. They are dry, flavourless, lacking in texture and boring. I’m going to give them a three out of ten. This is not worthy of accompanying my cheeseboard.

Oh, and ‘Entertaining Cracker’ is a terrible name. And it isn’t.

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Seasonal grocery shopping

December 23, 2017 at 13:06 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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Ahhh. Seasonal shopping. It seems that no-one really enjoys it much. One thing that strikes me, though, is how much of the stress seems be be centered around parking. Any discussion of it inevitably seems to lead to a moan about parking. So much so it even spills onto the national news. Of course, the option of not taking the car shopping seems to not occur to most people.

Last weekend, I did my present shopping. A quick ride out to my nearest mall, easy parking right outside the door. Shopped, loaded up and out in under an hour.

Today I needed to get the Xmas groceries. So it was off to the shops again. Straight past the queue of cars waiting to get in and a free park right outside the entrance where the food bit is. Here’s my shopping list:

That was a pretty packed trolley…! I did have a minor panic about getting it all on the bike, but in the end it was all fine, with the zip-up cold bag tied on top.

Easy peasy.

Merry Christmas, everyone!

Strava again

December 16, 2017 at 19:25 | Posted in bicycles | Leave a comment
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So with my new commute, I fired up Strava again, as I was curious about my new rote to work. After about ten minutes trying to remember my password, I managed to log in, and used it to record my journey to work for the first week or two.

So I now know my journey is fourteen kilometres, and quite flat. I have to say, Strava can get a bit addictive. For a while there, I was scrolling after each ride, revelling in the awards and personal bests. I even got a teeny bit competitive about one stretch, pushing harder and harder to try to get on the leaderboard. Which I managed to do – apparently I’m the 8th fastest to ride that stretch. I can only think it’s not a very popular bit of path, because mostly I languish around the ‘489 of 859’ mark…

However, after a while I realised it gets harder and harder. As you do more and more rides, the chances of getting a personal best get less and less. That little ‘Achievements’ icon becomes harder and harder to activate. And most segments are so ridiculously short that it has more to do with traffic lights and wind direction than it does to do with fitness. So, as the number of little award icons started getting less and less, I pretty much stopper using it again.

Oh well. In a few years perhaps I’ll have a new job, and can do it all over again.

 

PS – thanks to those people who gave me kudos. I’m not sure why, or who you are, or even what it is, but I felt a warm glow seeing it…

Tin trail

December 10, 2017 at 13:26 | Posted in bicycles, biscuits | 1 Comment
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My new journey to work is full of excitement. Some of it of the unpleasant kind – there’s more to come on this topic shortly. But, as always, travelling by bike offers all kinds of opportunities to experience things that you would just pass by in a motor car.

The other day, as I rode to work, I noticed a tin in the road. A biscuit tin, to be precise – of the kind that perhaps your grandmother had. You know, and old-fashioned metal tin, printed with pictures of biscuits and heritage. Nothing unusual, perhaps – just the usual rubbish and detritus that accumulates by the sides of our roadways.

And then, a bit further along, I saw another one. And another. And another. I must have seen twenty or thirty of them over a stretch of about five kilometres. They were quite evenly spaced, and was it my imagination, or where they strategically placed around junctions, to show a route? Yes, surely that was it! This was a biscuit tin trail, and I was following it.

Or at least, I was until it petered out. Oh well, perhaps not so exciting as I thought. Clearly I’ve been reading too many Secret Seven books to the kids. More likely just a recycling truck with a badly secured load.

Or was it? Perhaps I will read in the paper about some dastardly thieves and their biscuit tin plot…

Journey to Warudhar – Philip Arnold

December 2, 2017 at 10:51 | Posted in books | Leave a comment

Journey to Warudah is the debut novel from Philip Arnold. Set in post World War One Australia, it is a sort of coming of age story, following Jessica as she is alienated from her family by her mother’s religious conversion and finds love with a returned soldier, Harry Watkins. He then takes her to his remote farmstead in the bush, where the two of them create a new life together. They struggle to leave behind the ties and conflicts from the city, however, and these eventually catch up with them in a climactic ending.

The book is easy to read, and captures the colour and tensions of Australian life at that tumultuous time. The characters are well drawn, and the pace of the book is unusual – it seems to gradually gather pace as it progresses; the ending fairly tumbles off the pages as so many of the threads from earlier in the book are brought together in a crescendo finale that is hard to put down.

It’s a book worth picking up – there is a satisfying depth and complexity to the story, even if occasionally the characters seem a little emotionally two-dimensional.

And perhaps I should make a small disclosure – Phil Arnold is a friend of mine. Indeed, you can find a picture of him elsewhere on this blog (I’ll leave the detective work up to you, dear readers, to find it!). So you’ll have to decide how objective this review really is….

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